Friday, April 26, 2013

Peaceful Afternoon

It's been a peaceful afternoon around Camp Magruder. Check out what camp looks like when there is hardly anyone here.

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Friday, April 19, 2013

Poor Caleb

Thursday morning, April 11, Camp Magruder was a buzz of activity and energy. An unleashed dog ran into camp from the beach and got into a fight with Caleb. For those of you who don't know, donkeys and dogs do not get a long. Loud braying and barking alerted staff to a problem which was quickly resolved. The dog owner was incredibly sorry, but both animals walked away from this incident slightly hurt and shaken up. The vet came to check out Caleb and ended up giving him 10 stitches in the side of his upper lip and five days of antibiotics. Let me tell you, there is almost nothing as pathetic as seeing a donkey loopy with medicine who can hardly hold his head up to get his stitches. 



Caleb seems to have recovered for the most part. He remains a bit jumpy and easy to scare, but is loving the extra attention and treats he's getting from staff. He doesn't love the taste of his antibiotic at all, but Mary Poppins continues to be right. A spoon full of sugar (or molasses) helps the medicine go down. Caleb is scheduled to get his stitches out this coming Monday afternoon. 





Counselor In Training Event

Last weekend we had 10 high school students join us for the weekend to learn how to be camp counselors through our Counselor in Training (C.I.T.) program. They were an incredible bunch of youth with plenty of energy, creativity, passion, and leadership skills that will be an asset to our camping program this summer. A special thanks goes out to Kendra Sue, Brett, and Erin who served as counselors, mentors, and workshop leaders to these youth for the weekend.
 

The youth got here Friday evening and were thrown almost immediately into workshops. These sessions included planning and leading campfire and morning watch, age level characteristics and progression, active communication, faith sharing, leading small groups, leadership and personality styles, conflict resolution, assisting campers with special needs, counselor responsibilities, ecology activities, and leading group games. It's hard to believe that all those things were fit in to this short weekend and there was still time to make new friends and rekindle old friendships.






The youth ended their time together by creating a C.I.T. covenant. A copy of this covenant will be sent to the deans of their camping programs this summer, but serves as a reminder to the C.I.T.'s about what their job is  as counselors and leaders in the camp community.



We are looking forward to a great summer of mentoring these special youth and watching them grow from being campers to the next generation of camp leaders.